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Cool Cage Enclosed Ceiling Fans Design

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By John. Ceiling Fan. Published at Sunday, August 19th, 2018 - 01:48:12 AM.

Ceiling Fan Buying Tips Ceiling fans have been around for a very long time, the fan we all know being well over 150 years old; however, they are becoming a lot more common these days. With the multitude of shapes, sizes, colors and feature options now on the market, deciding on what type of ceiling fan to purchase can be a headache. It really does not need to be this way. These exotic fan features have all been produced to fit a variety of peoples needs and wants, and a lot of them were also designed to make installing a ceiling fan a lot easier. Here are some things you should do before you actually go out and purchase your ceiling fan. Pull out the tape measure: You will need to know the size of the room before you buy your ceiling fan. This will let you know what type of fan that you will need to buy. Rooms that are around 100 square feet, you will most likley be looking at a 36" fans. A 42" fan for rooms that are even larger then that. If you need a ceiling fan for rooms over 144 square feet, you will be looking at 44" and 48" ceiling fans. There are even larger fans then that for larger rooms. The biggest ceiling fans are 60" wide. A fan like this is able to cover rooms of up to 625 square feet! Now thats a big fan! Will the fan be indoors or outdoors? Outdoor fans are pretty hard to come by, but there are some available on the market. These types of fans are designed with the high temperatures, low temperatures, dirt, dryness and humidity of outdoor conditions in mind. That is why an indoor fan should NEVER be installed in outdoor conditions. Make sure you purchase the right fan for the right conditions. Some fan manufacturers have lifetime warranties on both indoor and outdoor ceiling fans. Whats your style? You know what your style is. Ceiling fan styles are usually grouped into Hippie, Standard, Modern, Futuristic and Abstract. The most Hippie design available today on the market is the Hunter 1886 styles. Lots of ceiling fan designs will resemble the very first ceiling fans ever to come out- the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, and look either Hippie or Standard depending on where the ceiling fan is installed. Five blade fans are Modern, and three-blade fans are more on the Futuristic side. What are Abstract fans? The Football Fan is just one of those. Lighting? Most of the ceiling fans available today will allow you to add lighting to it if you would like. Actually, a lot of fans will come with the lighting kits as part of the purchase. If light is needed in the very core of your setting, in addition to the fan, you can choose to buy the fan and lighting kits separately or as one whole package. If you buy them separately, its best to match manufacturers so you know that they will both fit each other. Powering the ceiling fan: Before recently, to control your ceiling fan and the lighting on that fan from a switch, you needed a three-conductor wire in between the switch and the wall. Now some fan manufacturers make controls that will allow you to wire up with your existing two-conductor wires. And even more, pretty much all fan-and-light combinations on the market can be packaged with a remote control that only needs two wires at the ceiling box to give it power. Support for the ceiling fan: This one of the most important aspects to installing your ceiling fan. A full assembly fan weighs alot. Actually, even the small ones weigh alot. Fans also move; a ceiling fan could not be mounted on a standard lighting fixture. It will most likely tumble to the floor. Most ceiling fan manufacturers have standard instructions packaged for mounting the fan to a certain type of mounting item above the junction item. This will be your best bet, but another option is installing a special fan box, either on the mounting or latched to it. To cool or not to cool? Most people think of ceiling fans as a device to keep a place colder. This is the most common use, but they are just as useful for keeping a room warm when it is cold outside during those winter months. Make sure you purchase a fan that will blow in the downwards direction during warm weather and upwards in cold weather. Blowing upwards will cause the warmest air in the setting up and out, to come back down along the sides of the room. It will definitely make the floor a lot warmer, and you will notice this

Why Do Ceiling Fans Have a Reversing Switch? What is the reason for having a reverse button on ceiling fans? Well "they" say that you cannot stand a draft during winter months, but that you can equalize the air temperature buy using your fan in the reverse direction. I always wondered why the older ceiling fans did not have a reverse button. Were the people who designed those fans, just too stupid to think about using reverse in winter? During winter, when you use the central heating system, the warm air coming out of the registers, in each room, will naturally rise and because the registers are up high already, the hot air will build at the ceiling level and gradually work its way down toward floor level. The heating unit runs until the temperature is comfortable at the lower levels of the rooms. But by the time this happens, it will be very hot at the ceiling level. Many BTUs are wasting heating the ceiling areas of the home, where we dont live our lives. But what if there was a way to get this hot air down off the ceiling, to the lower levels where we live. The heating unit would not need to work as long and the savings on our utility bill could be significant. AHH CEILING FANS! will bring this air down and mix the hot air with the cooler air at floor level. This mixing would basically equalize the temperature at floor and ceiling levels, which means that the heat would not be wasted keeping the ceilings warm. The heating unit would not run as much. The utility bill will be lower while the comfort level will remain the same. But then someone said that the draft created by the ceiling fans would be too much for winter months. So someone else said "well, lets just reverse the ceiling fans and let the air blow up until it hits the ceiling and then it will go horizontal in all directions until it hits the walls. Then it will come down vertically until it hits the floor. Now it will travel, at floor level, back in toward the center of the room and then back up to the ceiling fan. What a genius! Now everyone can use ceiling fans to equalize the temperature without feeling a draft in winter. Oh yea! So what happens when this warm air starts down the walls and hits furniture, bookshelves, etc? It will start a horizontal movement toward the center of the room. Now when it comes out past the obstruction, will it turn and fall toward the floor, where it can mix? If warm air falls instead of rising, then I guess it could. What happens when air from the ceiling fans hits the ceiling in a room with a sloped ceiling? If the ceiling fan is centered in the room, it would be basically half way up the slope. So wouldnt all the air go directly up the slope from where the ceiling fan is mounted? What about the other half of the room? What happens when the room is large? Will the force, coming down the walls, still be enough to get this warm air to the floor, especially when the ceiling is two stories high? What happens when ceiling fans are in a room with a two story high ceiling, which is open to the second floor level of the home? Wouldnt the warm air go off into the second level, instead of coming down to the floor and in this situation, wouldnt the ceiling fan steal the warm air from the first level and take it to the second floor, defeating the purpose for which it is being used? On the other hand, if you blow the air down, the hot air at the ceiling level will be forced down to floor level where it will move in all directions toward the outer walls of the room. The air can now mix and seek its own level. The hotter air will naturally rise to the ceiling level where it will be picked up by the fan to repeat the cycle. So wouldnt this be much more efficient than using reverse, especially in the scenario where the ceiling is two stories high and open to the second floor? But what about the draft? I say just run the ceiling fan at a low speed or the highest speed that you can tolerate and still be comfortable. Could reverse on ceiling fans be a marketing tool to sell fans in winter? You decide. But I do not think that the old folks overlooked something as important as this. I think that they used what was most efficient. I agree and my ceiling fans always blow down, winter and summer. And if you happen to have a room with the two story ceiling where the room is open to the second level, and where you notice the upstairs is always hot while the lower level is cold during winter, try using your ceiling fans in the down direction. You will not believe the difference!

How to Choose the Best Ceiling Fan for Your Needs! So, you may be wondering which ceiling fan is going to be the right one for you. There are a variety of different choices when it comes to ceiling fans, that it can be quite a task to pick out the one that is best for you and your home. If you are planning on purchasing ceiling fans in the near future, there are many things you need to consider. So, here are a few tips to help you pick out the best ceiling fans for your home. Fan Size First of all, when you are trying to find the best fans for your home, you will want to consider the size. Ceiling fans can be found in a variety of different sizes; however, the size of the room you are buying for will definitely influence this decision. If you are buying fans for a smaller room, then youll want to go for a smaller fan. However, for larger fans, youll need something that moves a bit more air, so a large fan, like a 50-54 inch fan, is a great choice. Noise The last thing you want in a ceiling fan is a lot of noise. Before you purchase a new ceiling fan, be sure to take the time to check the noise ratings. If you can actually test the fan and see how noisy it is. The best ceiling fans will be so quiet that youll barely even know that they are running. The Motor Type You will also find that the motor type is important when you are trying to pick out the best fan. There are two types of motors that are usually used in ceiling fans - friction driver motors and direct drive motors. Usually a direct drive motor is the best choice, since they last longer and have fewer parts that are separated. However, they do tend to be a bit more expensive, but are well worth the extra money youll pay. Lighting When picking out ceiling fans, youll need to consider whether or not you want lighting to come with the fans. Some fans come with light kits on them, while other fans do not. In some cases you may have to pick out the light kit separately as well. There are a variety of different light kits that you can choose from, and youll want to pick one that will look nice with the fan and offer plenty of light. Price If you are looking for the best ceiling fans, price is also going to be important. While you no doubt want to get a good deal, it is important to realize that you get what you pay for. Going with the cheapest fan will probably not be a great idea, but a fan that is a bit more expensive will have better features, such as remote controls, variable speeds, and a higher grade. So, you are often better of to spend a little more money for a fan that will be reliable and long lasting. No doubt choosing for the best ceiling fans for your home is important to you, and these tips can help you make the best possible choice. So, next time you are shopping for new ceiling fans, keep these simple tips in mind to help you pick out the very best.

Ceiling Fan Frequently Asked Questions I. What is the purpose of a ceiling fan? A ceiling fan serves two purposes 1. To provide a breeze thereby creating the "wind chill factor" 2. To circulate the air throughout a room or area II. How do ceiling fans lower the temperature? They dont, at least not literally. Unlike an air conditioner, ceiling fans do not directly affect the air temperature. That does not mean, however, that ceiling fans are not effective in cooling. As pertaining to the two purposes listed in question (I): 1. The moving air from a ceiling fan will help you feel cooler regardless of the temperature of a room. It is much the same as being outside in the summer-- it can be 80-90 degrees, and if there is a breeze, it is very pleasant. 2. The circulation from a ceiling fan can disperse the cool air from lower areas (and air conditioning) into the central, inhabited areas of a room. IIa. How do ceiling fans help heat in the winter? Much the same as they help with cooling in circulation. Running your heat in the winter, hot air rises to the ceiling, and so much of the heat is wasted. Running a ceiling fan during the winter, to push down warm air from the ceiling and eliminate cold spots, can save a great deal of heating energy. III. What rooms should have ceiling fans installed? EVERY room. Depending on your personal preferences, any and every room can benefit from a ceiling fan installed. The more time people spend in a given room, the greater the benefit of a ceiling fan. For circulation, especially large rooms, and/or those with high and/or vaulted ceilings. People will have their preferences on where they most prefer the benefits, but ultimately any room is a good idea. IV. What size fan is needed for a particular room? Ceiling fans commonly come in two sizes: 52" for larger rooms and 42" for smaller rooms. Many companies offer 30-36" fans for exceptionally small rooms, and 56-60" fans for larger and/or commercial settings. The most common size by far is the 52" fan, which is typically appropriate for most rooms. V. My ceiling is lower, do I need a hugger fan? Hugger fans are designed to provide the minimum distance between the ceiling and the fan blades. This is ideal for lower ceilings as it provides the maximum clearance between the blades (and other lower parts of the fan such as lights) and the floor. The downside is that the shorter distance between the blades and the ceiling impedes circulation to a degree. Hugger ceiling fans are less effective than regular ceiling fans regardless of ceiling height. VI. My ceiling is higher, how long of a downrod do I need? For maximum circulation, the blades should be positioned 8-10 from the floor. However having the blades too far away from the ceiling can sometimes lessen the effectiveness of heat destratification. Not to having the blades 9 from the ceiling on a 15 ceiling may look a little imposing. VIa. I have a vaulted ceiling, do I need a special kit? Usually not. It is standard for fans to include hardware that will allow the fan to be mounted on a ceiling up to a ~30 degree incline. Hugger fans are not designed to be mounted on a vaulted ceiling. There are other rare exceptions, these are usually noted by the manufacturer and can be adapted. VII. What sort of control options are available? Most ceiling fans made in recent years have a built in three-speed pullchain control. Regardless of whether or not the fan is wired to a separate switch, you have full control of the fan from the chain. Off-high-medium-low. Most fans are also reversible and have a reverse switch built into the fan body. If the fan has a light, the light will have its own on-off pullchain. The entire fan assembly can be controlled without the benefit of a remote switch. Many companies now offer fans with remote speed control options that allow for independent fan and light control without additional wall switches and wiring. These can include wireless remote controls, replacement wall switches, and computerized options that involve one, the other, or both. This allows a fan to be installed in a conventional two-wire hookup and benefit from the control options of a 3 wire (two switch) hookup without installing a third wire. The mobility of a wireless remote and the features of the computerized controls are additional benefits. Ceiling fans with conventional pullchain controls can be retrofitted with remote speed control options such as those mentioned above. The retrofit kits include the wall or wireless remote control, and a receiver that is attached inside the ceiling fan canopy and wires between the fan and the power source. The receiver requires only a two-wire power source, switched or unswitched. VIII. How many blades is best? These days ceiling fans are available with any number of blades from one to eight, although any number below 3 and above 6 is for novelty or decorative purposes only. Most fans have 4 or 5 blades, some are adaptable to take either. Most people assume that more blades move more air, i.e. a fan with five blades moves more air than a fan with four blades. This, in fact, is incorrect. More blades results in a greater load on the motor, and a greater load on the motor causes it to operate at a slower speed. A fan with less blades operating at a faster speed will more more air than a fan with more blades operating at a slower speed. This is why most commercial fans have three blades and a high speed motor, to provide the greatest amount of airflow efficiently. IX. What are the quality differences between fans on the market? Many different fans are available these days, with a great degree of different options, styles, designs, and prices. Often times people buy a fan for appearance-based reasons. But most consumers, about to spend a significant amount of money on a ceiling fan (or fans) are concerned about getting the best quality product, or at the very least the best quality product within their price range. It is a commonly held theory that you get what you pay for: the more something costs, the better quality it is. As with many products, that is generally true with ceiling fans, but there are other factors. When you buy a ceiling fan you are paying for three things: 1. Quality and features 2. Design/style 3. Name recognition The most expensive fan may be the best quality, or it may be the most expensive design, or it may be the best known brand name. IXa. What makes a ceiling fan Energy Efficient? How do I consider this when choosing a fan? There are three factors: 1. How much air is moved 2. How much current is drawn 3. The quality and construction of the fan Obviously the most efficient ceiling fan would be that which has the best #1/#2 ratio. However #3 is also a very important factor in buying a ceiling fan, and just because a fan has the best ratio does not mean it moves the most air. A fan that draws very little power but moves very little air may be considered very efficient. Additionally, if the fan has a light kit, the light kit is much more crucial to energy consumption than the fan motor. Ceiling fans typically draw ~100 watts or less on the highest speed setting, however the typical four socket light kit draws 240 watts consistently. Much more important than finding the most efficient motor, in this case, is maximizing the efficiency of the light kit. Compact Fluorescent light bulbs are ideal for this purpose-- the same light kit will then draw 60 watts or less. X. Fan Operation: What speed and direction settings should be used? This is a very subjective topic, and for most it was probably answered by parts I & II above. There are a number of factors that vary by setting and situation-- fan location, ceiling height, fan model, and most importantly, what purpose is intended. A few suggestions that may or may not apply: 1. It is unlikely that a fan would be used on high except to create a significant breeze. When you wish to do so the fan would be used in the downdraft setting. Depending on how much of a breeze is wanted medium speed may also be acceptable. 2. For a gentle breeze and circulation, in most cases the fan would be used on low in the downdraft setting. 3. To destratify heat (and for circulation) the fan would be generally set to updraft mode in low or medium speed. Heat can also be recirculated with low speed in the downdraft mode, depending on which produces more of a notable breeze. XI. How effective are ceiling fans with heaters built in? The most important thing to remember about any electric heater is that they use a great amount of electricity. This includes ceiling fan heaters as well as space heaters, etc. They are available with a variety of different sizes and settings, but the average uses ~1000 watts. It is not wise to use an electric heater unless it is absolutely necessary, using a heater ceiling fan (for example) in conjunction with an effective furnace etc will NOT save energy. So it would be a fair assumption that you should only consider a heater ceiling fan in a situation where you would also consider an electric space heater or the like. XII. What is the use for a fan mounted outside, such as on a porch? What sort of fan is recommended? If a fan is going to be exposed to rain and snow and such, youll want to make sure it is sealed so water cannot get into electrical parts. If its not actually going to be getting wet, just somewhere exposed to changes in climate (a covered porch, etc) you generally look for a fan with a finish that wont rust and blades that wont warp. Many companies offer fans that are specifically rated for these situations. These fans will have Underwriters Laboratories certification for damp or wet locations. If a fan is going to be subjected to these conditions it is important that it is able to do so safely. XIII. Ceiling fan lights-- what options are available? Ceiling fans being used with light attachments have become more and more common as years progress. It is significantly easier to install a ceiling fan where there is an existing light fixture than where there is nothing, but if you are removing a light source you will need to replace it. As a result, the majority of ceiling fans sold include light kits already attached.


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